Narrative

Telling the stories of D|AAD.

STREET FIGHT

DAAD team members attended Street Fight, an event hosted by Nashville Civic Design Center on April 6, 2017 at the Music City Center. Janette Sadie-Kahn, a former transit commissioner of New York City, was the speaker that inspired designers, developers, and other movers and shakers who attended to think about what a pedestrian oriented  city could mean for Nashvillains.

 

Street Fight book Nashville

 

Nashville is growing, with people moving to the city every day. We can only expand the infrastructure so much, which means we must learn how to use our roads for greener and more collective modes of transportation. One of the ways Nashville is taking steps towards the future is by proposing 82 bike lanes across the city. 

 

Improving the pedestrian landscape of the city improves the quality of life for all citizens in addition to the environmental benefits. Pedestrian-focused design can improve the economy, safety, and spirit of the community.  A more walkable city will be better for business, as New York City saw 50% increase in sales along bus and bike lane corridors after implementing transit improvements.  With Vision Zero (a plan to eliminate roadway fatalities and injuries) being accepted in Nashville, we will be safer.  Also, city improvement isn't just about improving transportation but providing public art, where artists make murals, sculptures, or interactive works. This improves our interaction with our city and each other, allowing any facade or space to be a destination.

 

As Sadik-Kahn said at the presentation, "It isn't a question of engineering but imagination." We have all the tools we need to get this into action. Be bold, Nashville, and let's get creative!

 

 

Resources:

http://www.walkbikenashville.org/dangerousbydesign2016

http://visionzeronetwork.org/resources/vision-zero-cities/

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Thanks to Amy Hardin at D|AAD for contributing this post.

RECORDING STUDIO WITH A PHARMACY NAME - LAYMAN DRUG COMPANY

Located at 1128 3rd Avenue South, Layman Drug Company has been a fixture in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood for almost 130 years. The original structure was built in the late 1890s and at times served as a pharmacy and as a private residence. As a part of the fabric of Music City, the structure has had its brushes with the music industry. Former employees tell tales of Johnny Cash visiting the pharmacy. The building was also featured on the cover of Dion’s Velvet and Steel album. The building’s ties to the music industry will become even stronger as its owner, Will Greig, oversees its transition to a high end recording studio.

 

Balancing the building’s historic character with modern functionality has been a priority for the design. While much of the building’s exterior has remained the same, the façade was rebuilt to match its former glory and to allow the structure to remain recognizable to a neighborhood that lives in a city of continual change. To accommodate its new function as a recording studio, the interior of the building has undergone significant modernization. Design elements such as 3D ceramic tiles, acoustical panels, acoustically rated assemblies, and color temperature adjustable lighting have all been incorporated.

 

The building will be open for business by early-Summer 2017. In the meantime, feel free to swing by Chestnut Street to check out the new Coca-Cola mural until construction is complete.

A 1980's photo of Layman Drug Company.

A 1980's photo of Layman Drug Company.

The cover of Dion's Velvet and Steel album.

The cover of Dion's Velvet and Steel album.

Rebuilding the exterior wall of the building.

Rebuilding the exterior wall of the building.

Recording room framing.

Recording room framing.

Mural in progress. 

Mural in progress. 


Owner:  

Will Greig

 

Contractor:  

Phipps Construction

 

Collaborators, Engineers, Etc:  

Olert Engineering

iDesign Services, Inc.

PWP Structural Engineers

Oil + Lumber

Murals and More LLC

Vintage Millworks

Studio Construction Service


Thanks to Amy Hardin at D|AAD for contributing this post.

DON'T FORGET TO LOOK UP

As a designer, I’m eternally and eagerly awaiting an opportunity to visit a different city, or hopefully country, and be inspired by new architecture, design and nature.  Someone once told me early on in my career that a good designer can compliment other designers' work.  Well, that must make me a great designer, because I am perpetually in awe of the creativity and design talents of others.  

 

I recently made a trip to Austin, Texas, a city that is often put into the same hip and growing “it city” conversation as Nashville, and was fortunate enough to explore some of the city's most thoughtfully unique hotels.  I love all aspects of design, but hospitality interior design is my passion.  Boutique hotels, in my humble option, are a collision of the most creative and exciting design woven together under a single roof - a wonderful mix of residential design in the guest rooms and suites, restaurant and retail design in the public areas, and if you’re lucky, spa design.  Most clients hire you to be your most creative self on these projects, and I’m fortunate enough to work for an architect whose passion for collaboration with other creatives pours into every project.  This unassuming approach gives way to some of the most pure and finely detailed spaces, creating interest without chaos, a level of casualness with a distinct sophistication, and a relatable interior that is as timeless as it is approachable.

 

My explorations in Austin did not disappoint; the South Congress neighborhood is active and quirky with amazing food, eclectic retail and great people watching.  It is also home to some fabulously designed hotels, providing me with opportunities to snoop and make limitless discoveries.  As a designer, my advice to you is: don’t forget to look up - you just might miss a design moment!

 

Hanging plants abound and create a more intimate and comfortable outdoor dining experience at the Austin Motel. Design: Bunkhouse

Hanging plants abound and create a more intimate and comfortable outdoor dining experience at the Austin Motel.

Design: Bunkhouse

The entry to Hotel San Jose is inconspicuous while passing on the bustling sidewalk of South Congress Avenue. Design: Bunkhouse

The entry to Hotel San Jose is inconspicuous while passing on the bustling sidewalk of South Congress Avenue.

Design: Bunkhouse

A lovely patio inviting you to explore your room at the Hotel San Jose. Design: Bunkhouse

A lovely patio inviting you to explore your room at the Hotel San Jose.

Design: Bunkhouse

Architecture and nature combine to welcome guests upon arrival at Hotel Saint Cecilia. Design: Bunkhouse

Architecture and nature combine to welcome guests upon arrival at Hotel Saint Cecilia.

Design: Bunkhouse

An intimate setting for breakfast or a cocktail at the Hotel Saint Cecilia. Design: Bunkhouse

An intimate setting for breakfast or a cocktail at the Hotel Saint Cecilia.

Design: Bunkhouse

Lobby restrooms contrast cool wall tiles with warm metals and wood at South Congress Hotel. Design: Dick Clark + Associates, Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Studio MAI

Lobby restrooms contrast cool wall tiles with warm metals and wood at South Congress Hotel.

Design: Dick Clark + Associates, Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Studio MAI

Lighting detail at the entry courtyard ceiling; don’t forget to look up - you might miss an unexpected design moment.  Design: Dick Clark + Associates, Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Studio MAI

Lighting detail at the entry courtyard ceiling; don’t forget to look up - you might miss an unexpected design moment. 

Design: Dick Clark + Associates, Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, Studio MAI


Thanks to Erin Bethea at D|AAD for contributing this post.